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SPARTACUS - GREAT COMMANDERS 2 oz Silver Ultra High Relief Coin 2018

SPARTACUS - GREAT COMMANDERS 2 oz Silver Ultra High Relief Coin 2018

US $269.99
SKU:
DC202165
Availability:
PRE-ORDERS START FEBRUARY 20, 2018 !

Description

This  amazing coin portraits Spartacus in the first coin of a brand new series called “Great Commanders”.  Spartacus was an arranger and a leader of the biggest slave uprising in ancient Rome (73-71 p.n.e.). He created an army, which opposed rules of those days but in the end it was fought down by Mark Krassus, Roman chief.

GREAT COMMANDERS series  

SPARTACUS
Spartacus (c. 111–71 BC) was a Thracian gladiator who, along with the Gauls Crixus, Gannicus, Castus, and Oenomaus, was one of the escaped slave leaders in the Third Servile War, a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. Little is known about Spartacus beyond the events of the war, and surviving historical accounts are sometimes contradictory and may not always be reliable. However, all sources agree that he was a former gladiator and an accomplished military leader.

According to the differing sources and their interpretation, Spartacus was a captive taken by the legions. Spartacus was trained at the gladiatorial school (ludus) near Capua belonging to Lentulus Batiatus. He was a heavyweight gladiator called a murmillo. These fighters carried a large oblong shield (scutum), and used a sword with a broad, straight blade (gladius), about 18 inches long. In 73 BC, Spartacus was among a group of gladiators plotting an escape. About 70 slaves were part of the plot. Though few in number, they seized kitchen utensils, fought their way free from the school, and seized several wagons of gladiatorial weapons and armor. The escaped slaves defeated legions sent after them, plundered the region surrounding Capua, recruited many other slaves into their ranks, and eventually retired to a more defensible position on Mount Vesuvius.

Once free, the escaped gladiators chose Spartacus and two Gallic slaves—Crixus and Oenomaus—as their leaders. Although Roman authors assumed that the escaped slaves were a homogeneous group with Spartacus as their leader, they may have projected their own hierarchical view of military leadership onto the spontaneous organization, reducing other slave leaders to subordinate positions in their accounts.

The response of the Romans was hampered by the absence of the Roman legions, which were already engaged in fighting a revolt in Spain and the Third Mithridatic War. Furthermore, the Romans considered the rebellion more of a policing matter than a war. Rome dispatched militia under the command of praetor Gaius Claudius Glaber, which besieged Spartacus and his camp on Mount Vesuvius, hoping that starvation would force Spartacus to surrender. They were surprised when Spartacus, who had made ropes from vines, climbed down the cliff side of the volcano with his men and attacked the unfortified Roman camp in the rear, killing most of them.

In these altercations Spartacus proved to be an excellent tactician, suggesting that he may have had previous military experience. Though the rebels lacked military training, they displayed a skillful use of available local materials and unusual tactics when facing the disciplined Roman armies. They spent the winter of 73–72 BC training, arming and equipping their new recruits, and expanding their raiding territory to include the towns of Nola, Nuceria, Thurii and Metapontum. The distance between these locations and the subsequent events indicate that the slaves operated in two groups commanded by the remaining leaders Spartacus and Crixus.

In the spring of 72 BC, the rebels left their winter encampments and began to move northward. At the same time, the Roman Senate, alarmed by the defeat of the praetorian forces, dispatched a pair of consular legions under the command of Lucius Gellius Publicola and Gnaeus Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus. The two legions were initially successful—defeating a group of 30,000 rebels commanded by Crixus near Mount Garganus—but then were defeated by Spartacus.

Reverse
Spartacus fighting on his horse with Roman army. In the background we can see slaves and gladiators assisting his leader. Red gold platter imitating blood on insurgent’s knives deserves particular attention.

Obverse
A map illustrating the precised track of the battles for freedom in Italy and of course, a figure of the Queen Elisabeth II.

Country

Niue

Year

2018

Face value

2 Dollars

Metal

Silver .999

Weight (g)

2 oz (62.213)

Size (mm)

50 mm   Thickness (mm) 3 high relief 

Quality

Antique Red-gold gilding

Certificate COA

Yes

Package type 

Box

Mintage (pcs)

999

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